Research

The FACET Story: FACET (Families Controlling and Eliminating Tobacco) is a program of research focused on finding ways to support tobacco reduction for women and their partners who smoke during pregnancy and postpartum.

Our primary aim is to reduce tobacco use in young families.

The three primary goals of FACET are:

Current Research Projects

FACET 4C: Smoke-free Men


Translating research findings through a tobacco reduction website for cancer prevention action.

There is growing support for the importance of creating gender specific health programs. However, few men-friendly tobacco reduction and cessation interventions have been developed and formally evaluated. This project will use interactive web technologies to bring the information, gained through consultations with new fathers and other groups of men who smoke, to support men’s efforts to quit smoking and prevent cancer.

Lead Investigators: J.L. Oliffe, J.L. Bottorff

Investigators: M. MacKay, B. Frank, C. Caperchione, L. Currie, J. Boomer

EARN $50 – Join this UBC Research Study

Are you a guy who smokes and wants to quit? Here’s your chance to tell us what you think about a new website just for men! Use the site as often as you want and fill out a short survey after 3 months (receive $25) and 6 months (another $25). START NOW: http://goo.gl/UKzn4B.

If you have questions, click here to email us.

Completed Projects

An International Workshop Supporting New Smoking Cessation Approaches for Chinese Men


The FACET research team was successful in applying for an International Research Grant in collaboration with the Center for Tobacco Control Research in Zhejiang University, China.

The goal for this workshop was to develop the framework for a joint research proposal. Other objectives included plans for continued collaborations in joint research projects and training opportunities for students and junior researchers.

The workshop was held December 1 – 6, 2013 in Hangzhou, China.

Canadian Team Members: Joan Bottorff, John Oliffe, Gayl Sarbit, Aimei Mao

FACET 5: Tobacco Reduction Support for Pregnant and Postpartum Women – Meeting Grant


Strengthening support for tobacco reduction for pregnant and postpartum women

A diverse team of researchers, practitioners and decision makers came together to discuss how emergent research evidence can inform new approaches to tobacco reduction for pregnant/postpartum women who smoke.

Lead Investigator: J.L. Bottorff

Investigators: Oliffe, J.L., Dauphinee, A., Poole, N.

Project Date: 2010

Funding Provided by: CIHR (Canadian Institutes of Health Research)

FACET 4B: Dads in Gear

Addressing CVD Prevention with an Innovative Men-centred Approach to Tobacco Reduction

The FACET team developed a men-centred approach to support tobacco reduction among expectant and new fathers. Dads in Gear (DIG), an innovative 8 week program integrating three components – tobacco reduction, fathering and healthy living (i.e., exercise and healthy eating) mobilizes men’s positive gender relations and fathering to prevent cardiovascular disease, as well as enhances the health of families through reduced tobacco exposure. The overall purpose of this research was to improve the DIG program feasibility, accessibility and dissemination by developing and pre-testing an on-line component of the DIG program

Lead Investigators: J.L. Oliffe, J.L. Bottorff

Investigators: J. Boomer, C. Caperchione, A. Dauphinee, C. Gotay, S. Wells

FACET 4A: Chinese New Fathers’ Project


The findings suggest that culturally-specific smoking cessation interventions should be developed for Chinese immigrant smokers.

The purpose of this project was to understand smoking practices among immigrant Chinese Canadian fathers to support their smoking cessation. Telephone interviews were carried out with 20 Chinese Canadian fathers. Findings showed that the Chinese fathers experienced the first smoking reduction after they moved to Canada from China and a further reduction and adjustment after they became fathers. While the perceived negative social environment for smoking in Canada had contributed to the overall decreased smoking, dominant Chinese ideology on fathering and family values, along with social-economic constraints of the Chinese immigrants, acted as both facilitators and barriers to their smoking. The findings suggested that culturally-specific smoking cessation interventions should be developed for Chinese immigrant smokers.

This study is now closed.

Lead Investigators: Aimei Mao, J.L. Bottorff, John Oliffe

FACET 4: Tobacco Reduction Support for New Fathers


New fathers have attracted little attention in terms of targeted tobacco reduction interventions.

Despite the connectedness of fathers’ smoking to family health, men have attracted little attention in terms of targeted tobacco reduction interventions. An innovative face to face program was developed to support expectant and new fathers in their efforts to reduce and quit smoking. The program focused on fathering, heart health (exercise and nutrition) and tobacco reduction. A pilot test was conducted to assess the feasibility and acceptability of this innovative program, and to evaluate the study protocol as a preliminary step to conducting a full-scale evaluation.

Lead Investigators: Bottorff, JL, Oliffe, JL

Investigators: Bhagat, R., Boomer, J., Dauphinee, A., Friesen, L., Gotay, C., Hill, P., Hussein, Z.

Project Date: July 2010 – June 2012

Funding Provided by: CIHR (Canadian Institutes of Health Research)

FACET 3: Tailored Tobacco Reduction Interventions During Pregnancy and Postpartum


The sex differences and contextual factors that influence tobacco use confirm the existence of distinct gendered practices, and therefore, demand targeted interventions aimed at tobacco reduction (TR).

The purpose of this study was to facilitate knowledge to action by using knowledge translation strategies to support the implementation of innovative gender-specific tobacco reduction interventions/strategies targeting pregnant/postpartum women who smoke, and fathers who smoke. The project involved interrelated components including knowledge translation processes to enhance tobacco reduction and an evaluation of the knowledge translation processes used throughout this project.

Lead Investigators: Bottorff, JL, Oliffe, JL

Investigators: L. Greaves, P. Hill, N. Poole, R. Bahgat, A. Dauphinee

Project Date: February 2008 – January 2010

Funding Provided by: CIHR (Canadian Institutes of Health Research)

FACET 2: A Gender Analysis of Tobacco Use in Families During Pregnancy, Postpartum, and Early Childhood


Mechanisms by which partners’ smoking influenced women’s return to smoking in postpartum.

In the second phase of FACET, the mechanisms by which partners’ smoking influenced women’s return to smoking in postpartum were examined. Fathers’ resistance to quitting, their responses to tobacco control messages targeting men, and the influences of masculinities on smoking and tobacco reduction experiences were also described.

Lead Investigators: Bottorff, JL, Oliffe, JL

Investigators: J.L. Johnson, L. Greaves, B. Poland

Project Date: 2005 – 2008

Funding Provided by: CIHR (Canadian Institutes of Health Research)

FACET 1A: Developing New Approaches to Smoking During Pregnancy


Developing new approaches to smoking during pregnancy: A Planning Grant.

Lead Investigator: Bottorff, JL

Investigators: J.L. Johnson, L. Greaves, B. Poland

Project Date: 2004 – 2005

Funding Provided by: Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative

FACET 1: Family Interaction Influencing Tobacco Reduction During Pregnancy and Postpartum


This research explored family dynamics and interactions that influence the process of tobacco reduction within the context of pregnancy and the postpartum period.

Lead Investigator: Bottorff, JL

Investigators: J. Johnson, L. Greaves, M. Stewart

Project Date: 2002 – 2004

Funding Provided by: CIHR (Canadian Institutes of Health Research)